BASEplatform in Depth: The I/O API

In the last article about our recently launched BASEplatform product, we gave an overview of the various modules that can be part of the BASEplatform. In this article we go in a little more detail about an important aspect of any embedded software product, the API. In this case, the I/O API since it’s one of the primary reasons to use the BASEplatform is to interface with on-board peripherals. This article will focus on the overall features while the fine details of the API will be the subject of yet another article. For now, here’s a few generalities valid for most of the BASEplatform API ...
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µC/OS support added to the BASEplatform

JBLopen’s platform support solution, BASEplatform™ now supports the µC/OS™ RTOS and stacks. Micriµm’s µC/OS, part of the Silicon Laboratories Inc.'s software portfolio is a high performance, resource-efficient RTOS with a full suite of communication and storage components. The µC/OS RTOS has consistently held top ranks as one of the most popular RTOS in the industry making it a natural choice for the first commercial RTOS supported by JBLopen's embedded software components. BASEplatform, a complete platform support solution, can now be used out of the box with Micriµm’s software. This in...
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JBLopen welcomes Sightsys as an official distributor

JBLopen Inc. is pleased to welcome Sightsys Ltd. as an official distributor for Israel. Sightsys is one of the largest distributors of hardware and software for the embedded computing market in Israel. They will act as a distributor of our products and services, including our recently announced BASEplatform embedded software product, a complete platform support solution for RTOS and bare-metal applications.  
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BASEplatform in Depth: The Modules

Two weeks ago, we launched our first embedded software product, BASEplatform. This article is the first of a series where we go into more details about the features and advantages of the BASEplatform. BASEplatform is designed to bring application developers all the necessary low-level components such as startup code, drivers, BSP, RTOS integration as well as toolchain support files and configuration in one, ready to go package that works out of the box. To fulfill this claim, the BASEplatform, is, at the heart of its architecture extremely modular. Developers are free to choose only the ...
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BASEplatform now supports the Xilinx Zynq-7000

We are happy to announce that the first platform supported by our recently announced BASEplatform™ is the Xilinx Zynq®-7000. BASEplatform, an embedded software component designed to provide users with all the necessary modules, BSP, drivers and RTOS integration to jump start their embedded software project, is now available on the Xilinx Zynq-7000. It is designed to tackle today’s application requirements by being RTOS and toolchain agnostic, allowing developers to select the most appropriate components for their application. The wide ecosystem support coupled with the versatile and exte...
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Introducing BASEplatform

We are proud to announce that we are jumping in the embedded software component market with the introduction of BASEplatform™. Tackling the fundamentals, BASEplatform is a collection of low-level interface modules, drivers, and board support packages. Designed from the ground up to provide the foundation of a successful embedded software design. Whether for a bare-metal project or with your choice of free or commercial RTOS, BASEplatform can help smoothly integrate multiple components from various sources. [caption id="attachment_564" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Example of BASEplatform...
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Zynq-7000 connectivity using the uC/OS BSP

In two previous articles, I have looked at using Micrium’s uC/OS RTOS on the Xilinx Zynq-7000. I only covered kernel and storage. This time, I will be exploring some connectivity options in combination with the Digilent Zybo. Namely, using Micrium’s USB device solution and HTTP server through the Zybo’s Ethernet port. This is also a perfect opportunity to try the new and improved release of Vivado 2017.1. The plan is to use the Zybo on-board SD Card to hold the html files for the HTTP server. To make it more interesting, instead of just copying the files using a PC, I’ll turn the Zybo into ...
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i.MX7D M4 Bare-Metal Bring-up and Benchmark

Following up on the last piece about the NXP i.MX 7, this article looks at the Cortex-M4 companion of the A7 present in the i.MX 7. Or to put it another way, a Kinetis-on-chip since it’s very similar to a high-end Cortex-M4 based Kinetis. This article summarizes my experience writing a brand new bare metal bring up for the i.MX 7. I’ll conclude with some benchmarks. (more…)
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i.MX7D Sabre Bare-Metal Bring-up and Benchmark

One of our specialities at JBLopen is board bring-up, either for bare metal or various commercial and open source RTOSes. Despite the number of different platforms, CPU architectures and RTOSes out there, low level bring-up, BSP and driver development are rarely discussed in blogs and articles on the web. While this is hardly my first experience with the NXP i.MX 7, I'll share in this article some of the important steps we take, writing from scratch, a bare metal environment for the i.MX 7 on the SABRE board. Porting most RTOSes would be similar. This already bulky article focuses on the A7 wi...
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Improving Interrupt Latency on the Cortex-A9

Continuing from the last post, this article explores features specific to early members of the ARM Cortex-A family such as the Cortex-A9. Namely the L2 cache and TLB lockdown features found in those processors. It’s important to note that those two features are not available in more recent 32 bits ARM processors such as the Cortex-A7. Newer cores have a simpler TLB, and most often than not an integrated L2 cache instead of the external L2 found on the A9. However, the Cortex-A9 is still a popular core, found on the Xilinx Zynq-7000 and NXP i.MX 6 SoCs to name a few. (more…)
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